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Oak Creek - Concerns about noise led city officials here to deny a conditional use permit for a proposed freight terminal at 500 W. Opus Drive. The measure was voted down 3-4 at the Nov. 22 plan commission meeting.

The project was proposed with two 20,000-gallon underground fuel storage tanks along with outdoor storage on just over 50 acres as part of tax incremental financing district eight.

The main purpose of the development would have been the distribution of packages.

Proposed by the Opus North Corporation, the facility would have had 315 employees after the full build out according to city planner Kari Papelbon. Phase 1 would have seen 105,901 square feet of dock created, 8,181 square-feet of office space and 9,760 square feet for a maintenance building, guard shack and fueling station.

Later phases would add 27,600 square feet of dock area and 8,426 square-feet to the maintenance building.  Papelbon said security fencing would be built around the property with guard shacks at each entrance.

The facility would operate seven days a week with three shifts per day.  For phase one, 264 employee parking stalls were proposed with six visitor spots, 314 trailer spaces, 176 van spaces, 114 tractor spaces and 109 spaces for dollies were proposed.

A project representative told commissioners that a traffic impact study showed there would be no significant impact on most of the interchanges in the area.

Why deny?

Major reasons commissioners cited for denying a conditional use permit included traffic and noise concerns.  Some also questioned if this was the best use for the site.

Commissioner and Alderman Chris Guzikowski said he struggled whether this was the best use of the property or not. Commissioner Fred Siepert was very sure of his position on the location.

"This doesn't appear to be the best location," he said.

Commissioner and Alderman Dan Bukiewicz said it was a "reasonable fit" for the location, but his biggest concern was the noise. The applicant had agreed to create buffers and vegetative screening, specifically to the residential area south of the property where a 30-foot setback was created. However, there was still some question if that would be enough.

Commissioner Walter Dickmann wasn't happy with many aspects.

"There are too many things here I'm unhappy with," he said.

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